Cream Projects is the art practice and creative studio of Ana Nicolaescu and Sebastian Tiew.

Through artistic, curatorial and educational forms of engagement, their work explores computer-generated mechanics and imagery in the larger context of photographic and filmic histories, as a way of making visible how emerging technologies contour our ever-evolving world.

As a hybrid practice, they explore game engine tools both as means for creative production in the film, music and fashion industries, as well as subjects of contemporary critique, through moving image artworks and teaching across schools of art and architecture.

Enquiries: info@creamprojects.com
Instagram: @creamprojects

©2022 Cream Projects





Cream Projects is the art practice and creative studio of Ana Nicolaescu and Sebastian Tiew.

Through artistic, curatorial and educational forms of engagement, their work explores computer-generated mechanics and imagery in the larger context of photographic and filmic histories, as a way of making visible how emerging technologies contour our ever-evolving world.

As a hybrid practice, they explore game engine tools both as means for creative production in the film, music and fashion industries, as well as subjects of contemporary critique, through moving image artworks and teaching across schools of art and architecture.

Enquiries:
info@creamprojects.com
Instagram:
@creamprojects

Too Many Humans 
2022

Episode 1: Nadim
Episode 2: Veronica 
Episode 3: MD

2022-ongoing

Editing and sound by Ela Man

Too Many Humans offers an alternative take on the present day corporate reconceiving of the ‘metaverse’. Three episodes reveal the lives of three protagonists: Nadim, who creates 360 virtual tours of a large art gallery; Veronica, who cleans an office, while employees work remotely; and MD, who picks up fast food orders from a dark kitchen.

These episodes sidetrack the conventional understandings and seductive promises of today’s corporate virtual sphere: they recontextualise it through already existing manifestations, which made themselves visible as the pandemic gripped the world. In this context, Too Many Humans visualizes what fell through the cracks: the real-life stories of those working near and around the hardware that supports the production and consumption of digital space.

The work turns open-world game engines on their heads: what otherwise renders the irresistible images of future virtual spaces, is now used to tell stories about the wet bodies currently left behind. Here, protagonists in mundane living pictures leak the shortcomings that result from leaving everyday reality into the ‘metaverse’.